Fellows 2022

ZAKARIA AL SHMALY

The Local Context of Refugee Political Socialisation: A Mixed-method Analysis of Syrian Refugees in Germany


United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology,
Bucerius Start Up Scholarship

ABSTRACT
The issue of asylum policy in Europe presents both a challenge and a test to liberalism: it presents a litmus test for implementing liberal values, while accepting that large numbers of refugees could lead to a rise of right-wing illiberalism. Yet, nation-wide German integration policies oversee the effect of local context on the integration of refugees who will later become full citizens. This research will explore the differences in the political socialisation of Syrian refugees in the German context to explore sub-national / regional / local variations. The research question is “to what extent do local politics affect the political behaviour of refugees in Germany?” Designed to study the effect of the composition of local governments (German state parliaments) on the political socialisation process of Syrian refugees, the research utilises the exogenous allocation of refugees to subnational regions (Länder) within the Königstein quota system. It draws on information from automated WhatsApp surveys specifically planned to target hard-to-reach refugee populations, complemented by insights from qualitative semi-structured interviews. The research has two goals: to investigate the causal chain between local politics and the political behaviour of integrated refugees, and to contributes to the discussion on the importance of local context in national politics.

BIOGRAPHY
Zakaria (Zak) Al Shmaly is a Syrian academic who researches the intersection between governance and technology, with a focus on European asylum policy. He worked with humanitarian and international organisations such as the International NGO Safety Organisation (INSO), Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), and the European Parliament. He holds a B.A. in Liberal Arts and Sciences from the University College Freiburg, an M.A. from the European University Institute, and is currently a Dahrendorf Fellow at Oxford University - St. Antony’s College and a Doctoral Fellow at the United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (UNU-MERIT). Zak is also a musician and a political theatre enthusiast.

PUBLICATIONS
Al Shmaly, Zakaria. 2022. “Citizen by choice? The effect of context on political socialisation of Syrian refugees in Baden-Württemberg and Brandenburg.” European University Institute. http://hdl.handle.net/1814/74779
Al Shmaly, Zakaria. 2022. “Europa, Wir Schaffen Das: using matching theory to allocate refugees across the EU.” EUI Transnational Democracy Blog. Mar 18, 2022. https://blogs.eui.eu/transnational-democracy/europa-wir-schaffen-das-using-matching-theory-to-allocate-refugees-across-the-eu/ (Aug 9, 2022)

YAA OPAREBEA AMPOFO

Circuits of Sense-Making: A Study of Youth Experiences of Human-Earth Relations, Ecological Knowledge, and Environmental Change in Ghana

University of Wisconsin-Madison,
Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarship

ABSTRACT
African youth have been positioned as particularly vulnerable to the consequences of climate change and environmental degradation. In response, there are growing environmental education efforts to support youth in learning about and responding to these changes. Such approaches tend to be grounded in and limited to Eurocentric knowledge systems that reify human-centered, developmentalist earthviews, and translate local actors and ecological contexts into homogenous, universal commodities. This study, therefore, offers a critical exploration of diverse representations of ecological knowledge in Ghana; how they are understood, experienced, and contested by young people; and how these heterogeneous approaches to conceptualizing human-earth relations, well-being, and environmental change impact Ghanaian youth’s abilities to survive and thrive under conditions of rapid environmental deterioration.

BIOGRAPHY
Yaa Oparebea Ampofo is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Education Policy Studies and Planetary Health Scholar at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. Her research focuses on African youth’s sense-making and movement-building around human-earth relations and environmental change as they move across diverse discursive, communal, and institutional spaces. Her work speaks to how we might imagine radically different and decolonizing pedagogies and policies for supporting youth across the continent in managing their needs and the needs of the planet, to be able to respond to the very rapid socio-ecological changes that are reshaping life across the world.

SAHAR BOSTOCK

Desert Colonization: Ottoman, British, and Zionist Development in Southern Palestine, 1830-1950

Columbia University in the City of New York,
Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarship

ABSTRACT
This dissertation project examines the cultural, political, and environmental impact of Ottoman, British, and Zionist developmental plans on the desert of Southern Palestine from the mid-nineteenth century to the establishment of Israel. It argues that Ottoman and British colonial developmental projects in the Palestinian desert laid the material and conceptual infrastructures for the subsequent Zionist colonization of the desert and the dispossession of its Bedouin inhabitants. The project analyses plans to build cities, railways, canals, irrigation channels, and communication technologies—some realized and others unfulfilled—and shows how they produced knowledge about the desert, shaped the living conditions of its inhabitants, and at the same time contributed to the image of the desert as an empty wasteland available for development.

BIOGRAPHY
Sahar Bostock is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of History at Columbia University. She is interested in the ways in which urban planning, transportation networks, and communication technologies shaped daily life in the desert and the interactions between Palestinian Bedouins, fellahin, urbanites, and Zionist settlers during the late Ottoman period and under the British Mandate. Her previous work examined Palestinian radio listening during the British Mandate. Before coming to Columbia, Sahar was an Arabic teacher, developed digital materials for teaching Arabic and Hebrew, and promoted the study of spoken Arabic in schools, universities, and private organizations in Israel.

LUNA CARRASQUER

Women Fight, Women Write: Renegotiating the Borders of the War Canon

Utrecht University, University of Oviedo,
Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarship

ABSTRACT
This Ph.D. project gives a central place to a new and rising body of literature: 21st-century female-authored literature on the Spanish War (1936-39). Firstly, the project examines how 21st-century female writers renegotiate the borders of the literary War Canon by means of their writing on war. Secondly, it seeks to establish the role that the representation and interpretation of the border in female-authored 21st-century war writings plays in this process of renegotiation. Drawing upon the concepts of Canon, Border and Gender, this project proposes to rethink the Canon from the Borderlands. It focuses on three ways of emphasising the movable character of the border: the borders of making war, viewing war, and writing war. Through these three lenses, the project analyses an international corpus of female-authored fiction on the Spanish War, written and published in the 21st-century.

BIOGRAPHY
Luna Carrasquer is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Oviedo (Instituto Universitario en Género y Diversidad) and Utrecht University. She holds a B.A. in Hispanic Studies and an M.A. in Literary Studies (cum laude) from Utrecht University, as well as an M.A. in Spanish and Spanish American Literature from the University of Salamanca. Her research focuses on contemporary (Spanish) literature on the Spanish War (1936-39), female authorship, and the literary canon. Prior to starting her Ph.D., she worked as a junior lecturer at Utrecht University, teaching Spanish language, culture and literature.

PUBLICATIONS
Carrasquer, L. "La memoria intergeneracional de la Guerra de España y el franquismo en Alfons Cervera." Itinerarios, no. 35, 2022, pp. 133-51.
Carrasquer, L. “Memoria de la dictadura, hibridez y ambigüedad en La dimensión desconocida, de Nona Fernández.” Taller de Letras, no. 67, 2020, pp. 22-40.

ELERI CONNICK

The Diaspora as Cultural Creative Spaces

University of Amsterdam,
Bucerius Start Up Scholarship

ABSTRACT
Thecomparative diasporic study explores whether diasporas can act as cultural creative spaces to remember, construct, and define notions of identity and heritage. It focuses on five diasporic communities from the Middle East and Global South for whom there is a history of violence. It challenges perceptions that diasporic spaces are seeped in nostalgic discourse in the negative sense. This project seeks to understand how memories of violence in the past intertwine with conceptions and performativity of identity and heritage in the present. Thus, it explores the hypothesis that diasporic cultural creative spaces are spaces to both empower and preserve heritage under threat.

BIOGRAPHY
Eleri Connick achieved cum laude honours in Conflict Resolution and Governance from the University of Amsterdam in 2021, and a Master of Honours in Philosophy from the University of Edinburgh in 2018. Her Master’s thesis “Blurring the Distance” challenged assumptions of entity-oriented approaches to studying diasporas in terms like “diasporas as agents of conflict-resolution”, and was shortlisted for two M:A: thesis prizes: Amsterdam Centre for Middle Eastern Studies on a topic on MENA at the University of Amsterdam and the Stichting Vredeswetenschappen ‘Visions on Peace’ Prize for best contribution to peace in the Netherlands. Eleri Connick is based in Amman, Jordan.

PUBLICATIONS
Connick, Eleri (2022). ’Novels of Witness’: Palestinian Novels as Acts of Witnessing the Everyday. History, Culture, and Heritage, AHM Conference 2022: ‘Witnessing, Memory, and Crisis’, Jun 2022, Volume 1, p.41 - 46. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5117/9789048557578/AHM.2022.006

LINA GABRIELA CORTÉS

Artistic Productions of the Brazil-Uruguay Border: Mixed Portuñol

National University of San Martín,
Bucerius Start Up Scholarship

ABSTRACT
Along the border between Brazil and the other countries of South America, there are different geographies, populations, cultures, and a wide linguistic heterogeneity. In the border between Uruguay and Brazil there is a long-standing interaction between Spanish and Portuguese, which results in a mix of languages that is known as Portuñol. My project analyses different artistic productions elaborated in Portuñol, particularly, the work of three artists from the Uruguay-Brazil border who share sensations, ideas and use some metaphors based on their joint experience to refer to their place of speech, their creative processes and their artistic productions.

BIOGRAPHY
Lina Gabriela Cortés was born in Bogotá, Colombia. She obtained her B.A. in Literature at the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana de Colombia and is currently a student of the Master's program in Latin American Literature at the Universidad Nacional de San Martín in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She was a scholarship recipient of the Regional Integration Scholarship Program to study for a master's degree in Latin American Social Studies at the University of Buenos Aires. She is a member of the Latin American Studies Association. She is interested in Latin American, feminist, environmental, literary and geological studies. She also writes poetry.

PUBLICATIONS
Cortés, L.G (2021) Mixed Verses at the uruguayan border: a conversation with Fabián Severo. Perífrasis. Journal of Literature, Theory and Criticism 12, n.o 24 (2021): 132-146.
Cortés, L.G., Rodas, C., otros (2021) Social sciences and pandemics: a commitment to decolonial transdisciplinarity to overcome binarisms Vol 4. Special issue.
Cortés, L.G., (Year produced) Artistic productions of the Uruguay-Brazil border: intermingled portuñol. Manuscript submited for publication as Book Chapter – CALAS – Maria Sibylla Merian - Center for Advanced Latin American Studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences, Bielefeld University and Guadalajara University.

ARNAB DUTTA

In Search of an Alternative Europe: Germanism in the Bengali Imagination, 1919–1945

University of Groningen,
Bucerius Dissertation Completion Scholarship

ABSTRACT
Contributing to the burgeoning research-field of globality and entanglements beyond their apparent Euro-American frontiers, Arnab’s Ph.D. project shows how Bengali intellectuals from Interwar British India drew upon, contested and negotiated political ideas from Germany to redefine the boundaries of Bengali nationhood. It also analyses why such intellectual relations created an alternative version of political action and political community within the anticolonial rhetoric of late-colonial British India. Using a plethora of sources available in several South Asian and West-European languages, this research contributes to the global intellectual history of twentieth-century Internationalisms by juxtaposing an ethno-linguistic mode of internationalism of two language-communities (German and Bengali) with parallel processes of diverging political internationalisms such as the Comintern, global fascism or liberal universalism.

BIOGRAPHY
Arnab Dutta is a final-year Ph.D. candidate of Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. He has also been a visiting doctoral fellow at the Department of History of Ideas, Uppsala University (2019-20); European University Institute Florence (2021) and the Global Intellectual History Graduate School, Freie Universität Berlin (2021-22). Arnab has previously studied at Jadavpur University, India; and later on, completed his Erasmus Mundus Joint-Degree M.A. in European Studies from Göttingen, Groningen, and Uppsala. Among others, he has been awarded with the Duke of Arenberg Award 2018, and the International Weimar Award 2020 from the Klassik Stiftung Weimar, Germany.

KARL HEYER

Ambiguous Policy, Uneven Implementation, Discretionary Practices. A Situated Analysis of Fragmented Spatio-legal Bordering Dynamics in the post-2015 European Border and Migration Regime on Sicily

Universität Osnabrück,
Bucerius Dissertation Completion Scholarship

ABSTRACT
Employing a situated approach from the perspective of everyday experiences of migrants and their supporters in Palermo, Sicily, my interdisciplinary Ph.D. project traces how legal, practical and localised socio-cultural knowledge about migration is produced and enacted in the nexus of ambiguous policies, their uneven implementation and discretionary practices, and how this shapes contemporary bordering dynamics in Palermo and beyond. Building on ethnographic research and interviews, it contributes to current debates in border studies by analysing the co-constitutive relationship between ambiguity and local discretionary practices and the ongoing spatio-legal fragmentation of the EUropean Migration and Border Regime.

BIOGRAPHY
Karl Heyer is a Ph.D. candidate at the Institute for Migration and Intercultural Studies (IMIS), University of Osnabrück. Drawing on critical geographical and cultural anthropological perspectives, his research and teaching focuses on the ways borders are being (re-)produced, interrogated and (un-)made at the local level. He is a member of kritnet (Network for Critical Migration and Border Regime Research) and was part of the graduate programme "Migrationsgesellschaftliche Grenzformationen" ("Boundary formations in migration societies") funded by the Lower Saxonian Ministry for Science and Culture (2017-2020). He received his M.Sc. in Geography in 2014 from the University of Göttingen.

PUBLICATIONS
Heyer, K. (2022). Keeping Migrants at the Margins. Governing through ambiguity and the politics of discretion in the post-2015 EUropean Migration and Border regime. Political Geography 97. DOI: 10.1016/j.polgeo.2022.102643
Hänsel, V., Heyer, K., Schmidt-Sembdner, M., & Schwarz, N. V. (2022). Von Moria bis Hanau - Brutalisierung und Widerstand. Grenzregime IV. Berlin, Hamburg: Assoziation A.
kollektiv orangotango+. (2018). This Is Not an Atlas. A Global Collection of Counter-Cartographies. Bielefeld: transcript Verlag.
Heyer, K. (2022). Ein Blick aus Palermo: Lokale Aushandlungen um restriktive Migrationspolitiken und die Fragmentierung des Grenzregimes seit 2015. In Von Moria bis Hanau - Brutalisierung und Widerstand. Grenzregime IV (pp. 296–314). Berlin, Hamburg: Hänsel, V., Heyer, K., Schmidt-Sembdner, M., & Schwarz, N. V. (2022). Von Moria bis Hanau - Brutalisierung und Widerstand. In Von Moria bis Hanau - Brutalisierung und Widerstand. Grenzregime IV (pp. 7–33). Berlin, Hamburg: Assoziation A.
Heyer, K. (2021). Grenzen überwinden! Ein anarchistischer Blick auf Grenzen und Migration. In germaine f. spoerri & F. Stenglein (Eds.), anarchistische geographien. Beiträge zu den Radical Geographies (pp. 119–138). Münster: Westfälisches Dampfboot.

MARQUISAR JEAN-JACQUES

Lines Drawn in the Sand: The Shifting Boundaries of Kali’na Territory at the Mouth of the Maroni River

Université de Guyane,
Bucerius Dissertation Completion Scholarship

ABSTRACT
The Kali'na live on both sides of the Maroni River, which is also the Franco-Surinamese border. The effects of colonial and post-colonial border management on this region affected coastal Kali’na settlements and reduced their territory. However, they regularly cross the border and take advantage of its opportunities. This feeds the evolution of a dynamic territoriality, local knowledge of places and of intense cyclic coastal changes. Through this knowledge Kali’na managed to maintain their culture and coastal position, although they have been subjected to significant assimilation and globalization. Using community mapping, this research will document the network of places and spaces that constitutes Kali’na territory, and articulate how this territory is appropriated to reaffirm their identity and connection to the land.

BIOGRAPHY
Marquisar is a doctoral student in Geography at the University of French Guiana, and UMR LEEISA. She has a background in Geography from which she obtained a Bachelor degree and two Ms.C. respectively at University of Bordeaux-Montaigne and Aix-Marseille University (both in France). She specializes in land planning, GIS, and community mapping of risk perception (coastal erosion, flooding), and has conducted projects in Awala-Yalimapo (French Guiana) and in Sakha Republic (Siberia, Russia) respectively with the Kali’na and Sakha people. Her research interests concern interrelationships between societies and their environment, especially in coastal zones, for which she favors holistic approachs to research that aim for better comprehension of biocultural changes.

PUBLICATIONS
Jean-Jacques, M., Palisse, M., Van den Bel, M., Gardel, A., and Anthony, E. (in press), Whose climate change is it? A thousand-year example of Kali’na responses to shifting coastal landscapes in the lower Maroni River, In J. A. Whitaker, C. G. Armstrong, and G. Odonne (Eds), Climatic and Ecological Change in the Americas: A Perspective from Historical Ecology, Routeledge.
Jean-Jacques, M. (2020), Territorialiser les risques côtiers à Awala-Yalimapo : des perceptions différentes, In M. Noucher and L. Polidori (Eds), Atlas Critique de la Guyane (p.184-185), CNRS Editions.
Palisse, M., Collomb, G., Lamaison, D., Morel, V., Cuny, P., Jolivet, M., Jean-Jacques, M., Laplanche, B., and Gardel, G. (2022), Living on an ever-changing coast: French Guiana populations facing coastal mobility. Geojournal.

SUVI LENSU

Cosmopolitanism from the Margins – Embodied Migrations, Beauty and Belonging amongst Rwandan Cross-Border Sex Workers

The University of Edinburgh and Aarhus University,
Bucerius Dissertation Completion Scholarship

ABSTRACT
This thesis examines Rwandan cross-border sex workers’ embodied migrations in East- and Central Africa. Based on a yearlong ethnographic fieldwork, conducted in 2019, I study how the female and transwomen sex workers used their access to transnational space, international connections and material goods as a means to construct cosmopolitan identity, thus gaining social and cultural agency at home and abroad. Against the backdrop of geopolitical tensions in the East and Central African borderlands, I demonstrate the sex workers’ skilful navigations through tightening custom regimes and the Ebola outbreak. By employing a feminist epistemological standpoint this study produces gendered and embodied border knowledge from a subaltern perspective.

BIOGRAPHY
Suvi Lensu is a final year Ph.D. candidate in African Studies and Social Anthropology at the University of Edinburgh and Aarhus and simultaneously part of a multidisciplinary research project ANTHUSIA - Anthropology of Human Security in Africa. She is also a member of AntroBlogi Newsroom, which is a Finnish language anthropological online journal. Her research interests include gender, sexuality, border(lands), livelihoods and visual anthropology. Prior to her Ph.D., Suvi Lensu has conducted fieldwork in Argentina, and completed M.A. in Latin American studies at the Stockholm University and B.A. in Development studies and African studies at SOAS in London University.

PUBLICATIONS
Lensu, Suvi: I search ‘how to make my skin white’ – Cosmopolitan Beauty Practices amongst Rwandan Migrant Sex Workers, Panel Skin Beyond the Social, at Freie Universität Berlin (18.02.2022).
Lensu, Suvi: Rwandan cross-border sex workers navigating through violence and conflict in Goma, DRC, Panel at the IUAES conference, Mexico (11.11.2021).
Lensu, Suvi: Filming Home, Plurality of Identity, Belonging and Homing in Transnational African Cinema A Case Study of the Films Restless Wandering, The Place in Between, and That’s My Face. Nokoko, vol. 5, May 2016, pp. 1–34.
2016-2022 Several publications in AntroBlogi, https://antroblogi.fi/author/suvilensu/

DAVID MOTZAFI-HALLER

A Nation of Families among the Family of Nations: Upwardly Mobile Israeli Developers and their Families in the Middle East and Africa, 1926 – 1979

The Geneva Graduate Institute
Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarship

ABSTRACT
David Motzafi-Haller’s doctoral project is a social history of the transnational non-humanitarian development sector. Focusing on a few Zionist-Israeli families involved with Israeli parastatal contractor Solel Boneh, it traces the upward social mobility of developers during final decades of empire and decolonization across a range of arenas in Israel/Palestine, the broader Middle East, sub–Saharan Africa and Latin America. Privileging the framework of family history, David uses the tools of micro-history to revisit and nuance the material dialectics of world-systems theory by identifying the everyday tactics of accumulation and the strategies of investment which transformed a career in development to lasting upward mobility. In focusing on how the social and physical mobility of men’s careers implicated extended kinship networks, wives and husbands, children and family friends, and led a wide array of household arrangements, he takes a non-androcentric approach to study of experts and a socially anchored approach to the study of expertise.

BIOGRAPHY
David Motzafi-Haller is a Ph.D. candidate at the Geneva Graduate Institute (IHEID). His main academic interests lie in the type of questions asked by scholars who inhabit the intersection between historical ethnography, oral history, family history and micro-history. Alongside his doctoral Ph.D. project, David has been continuing to publish work on development towns in Israel, which begun as an outcrop of his M.A. thesis at Tel-Aviv University (2017, summa cum laude). He is also an active editor and translator, translating academic work and popular texts in French, English and Hebrew. To date, his academic work has been published in several peer reviewed journals: Mashriq & Mahjar, Journal of Israeli History, Middle East Studies, Katedra, and Israel.

SHREYA PARIKH

Race and Racialization in North Africa: The Case of Blackness in "Arab" Tunisia

L’Institut d’Études Politiques de Paris, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarship

ABSTRACT
Historical studies link presence of Black citizens in North Africa with slavery; migration scholars link increasing presence of Sub-Saharan African migrants to externalization of European borders. Yet, how has the presence of these two populations shaped today’s constructions of race in North Africa? I address this gap in my dissertation through study of Blackness in “Arab” Tunisia. More specifically, I study how race becomes a border dividing and categorizing populations as “national” versus “foreign” in a society that sees itself as ethnically and racially homogenous. I examine two linked processes: first, the racialization of both darker-skinned Tunisians and Sub-Saharan migrants as ‘Black’, and, second, the negotiation and contestation of this racialization by the ‘Black’ populations. I employ a multi-sited multi-method research design (interviews and observation) to understand micro-narratives and macro-discourses that place dark-skinned Tunisians and Sub-Saharan Africans in racial category of ‘Black.’

BIOGRAPHY
Shreya Parikh is a dual Ph.D. candidate in sociology at CERI-Sciences Po Paris and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and affiliated researcher at Institut de Recherche sur le Maghreb Contemporain (IRMC) in Tunis. Her dissertation research focuses on the constructions and contestations of race and racialization in Tunisia through a focus on the study of racialization of Black Tunisians and Sub-Saharan migrants. Parikh is interested in the study of race, borders, migration, and citizenship in the North Africa region and its diaspora. Her research has been previously funded by the Merian Centre for Advanced Studies in the Maghreb (MECAM) and Global Religion Research Initiative (GRRI) at the University of Notre Dame (among others).

PUBLICATIONS
Parikh, Shreya. 2022 (11 August). "Blue Borders, Dark Bodies: The Mediterranean as a Site of Racist Murder." The Wire. New Delhi, India.

Parikh, Shreya. 2022 (24 February). "'Islamic World': The Problems With India's Construction of West Asia as Uniformly Muslim." The Wire. New Delhi, India. (Translated to Nepali and reprinted in Naya Patrika Daily - Nepal)

Parikh, Shreya. 2021 (Summer). “The Limits of Confronting Racial Discrimination in Tunisia with Law 50." MERIP Middle East Report 299.
Parikh, Shreya. 2021. "La construction et la contestation de la blackness autour de la Méditerranée: cas de la Tunisie et de la diaspora tunisienne en France." Le Carnet de l'IRMC. Tunis, Tunisia.
Parikh, Shreya. 2021 (29 November). "Borders live on dark bodies, even in Tunisia" Nawaat. Tunis, Tunisia.
Parikh, Shreya. 2021 (6 August). "Tunisia: On Moments of Political Uncertainty and Attempts to Negotiate the Meaning of Democracy" The Wire. New Delhi, India.
Parikh, Shreya. 2021 (11 May). "The Covid catastrophe isn't about India being "poor", Tunisia neither." Nawaat. Tunis, Tunisia.
Parikh, Shreya. 2021 (14 February). "From Farmers' Stir in India to Tunisian Protests, it is a Story of Masses Left Behind" The Wire. New Delhi, India.
Parikh, Shreya. 2019 (27 October). "No Country Needs a Burqa Ban" The Wire. New Delhi, India.
Parikh, Shreya. 2019 (21 September). "Not just Mexicans, more and more Indians are entering Donald Trump's US illegally." ThePrint. New Delhi, India.

NAMA'A QUDAH

Paths of Displacement and Refuge: Tracing the Movement in Al Wehdat Camp in Amman, Jordan

Delft University of Technology,
Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarship

ABSTRACT
The notion of being “At once inside and outside our world” as expressed by Edward Said in his book After the Last Sky: Palestinian Lives (1986:6) is the lens through which the socio-spatiality of Wehdat Camp in Amman investigated, particularly in relation to a number of everyday boundaries that are produced and transformed through flows of movement and activity, along paths of displacement and refuge, shaped by gender and notions of identity. By tracing the movement of bodies in the camp, the everyday spaces of the camp will be spatially investigated in relation to five components: the paths of displacement, the institutional grid and layout, the terrain and camp-scape, the streets and activity corridors, and the walls and thresholds.

BIOGRAPHY
Nama’a Qudah is a doctoral candidate at TU Delft, at the department of architecture. Her research focuses on the architecture of Palestinian Refugee Camps, with an emphasis on Al Wehdat Camp in Jordan. Focused primarily on the issue of emergency architecture and the architecture of displacement, Nama’a is driven by the aim of de-colonizing the knowledge produced about Palestine in general and camps in specific to be able to produce action-based research that is more empirical and reflective of its environment. Her professional career was divided between practice and academia, having worked between the Netherlands, Germany, the UK and Jordan.

ANDREAS STOIBER

The Social Life of Satellite Images – A Qualitative Research Project into the Work of Space-Eye and the Application of Artificial Intelligence for Supporting Sea Rescue Missions

University of Amsterdam,
Bucerius Strat Up Scholarship

ABSTRACT
My project engages with the work of the Regensburg-based NGO Space-Eye and their goal to combine artificial intelligence and satellite images to support civil sea-rescue missions. I combine approaches from the Anthropology of Technology, Science-Technology-Society-Studies, Actor-Network Theory, and the Anthropology of Borders to engage with the socio-technological network by looking at three technological approaches its members utilise to analyse the possibilities and restrictions resulting from these practices. Furthermore, I will look at the socio-technological side by engaging with collaborations with other organisations and frictions emerging due to Space-Eye´s positionality at the interface of scientific knowledge production and humanitarian action. Additionally, I embed the Space-Eye project within the wider socio-technological network/assemblage active within the Mediterranean frontier zone. Finally, I formulate ethical considerations resulting from my empirical engagement with the project.

BIOGRAPHY
Andreas Stoiber earned his B.A. in Social and Cultural Anthropology and Philosophy at the Ludwig-Maximilian Universität München. He completed two Master´s Degrees, one in “Sociology & Global Change” at the University of Edinburgh and one in “Cultural and Social Anthropology” at the University of Amsterdam (UvA). He participated as Beyond Fellow at the “AI4EO Future Lab” of the Entrepreneurial University – München (TUM) and as member of the Institute for Advanced Studies at the UvA. He presented his preliminary research results at the “Anthropology of Technology” Conference at the Aarhus University, the Anthropology of Confinement Network meeting/workshop and the “Volumetric City Playshop”, both at the University of Amsterdam.

SIMON TRUNK

Negotiating Life in between Empires: Debates on the Position, Possibilities and Belonging of Bosnian and Cypriot Muslims in Relation to the Ottoman Empire and Austro-Hungarian and British Rule

Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg,
Bucerius Start Up Scholarship

ABSTRACT
When in 1878 the Ottoman Empire had to cede control over their region to Austria-Hungary and the British Empire respectively, the Muslims in Bosnia-Herzegovina and on Cyprus had to face difficult questions: How could Muslim life under Christian rule be organized, were they obliged to emigrate and which role could the Ottoman Empire play for them? Studying how these questions were addressed and discussed by local Muslims, emigrants, imperial administrators, and the Ottoman government and press is the main objective of my project. Thoroughly investigating the diverse views on these issues promises to shed new light on Muslim life under non-Muslim rule in former Ottoman territories and the factors which influenced both intellectual discussions on and popular attitude towards it.

BIOGRAPHY
Simon Trunk received his Bachelor‘s Degrees in History and Near Eastern and Jewish Studies from the University of Tübingen, Germany and is currently completing his Master‘s Degree in Turkology at Bamberg University, Germany. He specializes in Late Ottoman and post-Ottoman history with focus on the dynamics between empires, national movements, religion and multiple identities and the strategies of both elites and general populations for dealing with a rapidly changing environment. Special research interests include Muslim migration into the Ottoman Empire, Ottoman Jewish history, law reforms in late Ottoman times and Early Republican Turkey, and the Ottoman legacy in Southeastern Europe.

LIN YI-HUI

Untangling China: Everyday Lives and Nation-Making

Utrecht University,
Bucerius Start Up Scholarship

ABSTRACT
To better understand the current trajectory of Chinese nationalist thinking in the era of Xi Jinping, this project develops insights into how the behaviours of everyday Chinese actors actively sustain, reproduce, and co-constitute Chinese sovereignty. Building on the concept of the ‘everyday’, this project focuses in particular on taken-for-granted expressions of sovereign identity as reproduced within a set of conventions, cultural practices, and intimate relations, through which societies produce citizens aligned with the interests of the state. In so doing, it highlights the importance of taking into account digital media, popular culture, and national festivities as factors that go into the making of contemporary Chinese nationalism and social identities.

BIOGRAPHY
Yi-Hui Lin is a research master’s graduate. Her current research interests include the everyday in international politics, traumatic memory, nationalism and sovereignty, and feminist methodologies. She obtained her research master’s degree in Public Administration and Organizational Science from the University of Utrecht.

EMINA ZOLETIC

Intergenerational Transmission of the Memory of the War: The Cases of Families in Bosnia-Herzegovina
and the Bosnian Diaspora in Europe

University of Warsaw,
Bucerius Ph.D. Scholarship

ABSTRACT
This research project deals with the intergenerational transmission of memory, with a focus on the first generation of Bosnians who experienced the 1992–1995 war and their children, born after the war in Sarajevo and currently living in the EU countries, the UK and the U.S. The study of wartime memory transmission has great social and political significance. The principal aim of this project is to explore the dynamics of intergenerational transmission of the memory of war among families living in Bosnia-Herzegovina and the EU Bosnian diaspora, with a particular focus on how the past is remembered. The study will provide detailed accounts of the Bosnian war from multiple perspectives, along with competing explanations of the cause, resolution, and outcome.

BIOGRAPHY
I am a doctoral student at the Doctoral School of Social Science at the University of Warsaw, and I am working on my doctoral project: "Intergenerational transmission of the memory of the war: The Cases of Families in Bosnia-Herzegovina and the Bosnian diaspora in Europe." I work under the joint supervision of Joanna Wawrzyniak (the University of Warsaw, Institute of Sociology) and Chris Hewer (Kingston University, UK, psychology). In my research, I leverage my background in psychology (a bachelor’s degree from the University of Sarajevo) and two master’s degrees in health sciences at Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, and the University of Paris, as well as ten years of clinical experience at the university hospital as a clinical psychologist.

PUBLICATIONS
Blackburn, A. M., & Vestergren, S, & the COVIDiSTRESS II Consortium (2022). COVIDiSTRESS diverse dataset on psychological and behavioural outcomes one year into the COVID-19 pandemic. Scientific Data, 9(1), 1-25.
Nguyen, V,T, Rivière, P, Ripolle, P, Barnier, J, Vuillemot, R, Ferrand, , Cohen-Boulakia, S, Ravaud, P, Boutron, I, The COVID-NMA Consortium Team (2021). Research response to COVID-19 needed better coordination and collaboration: a living mapping of registered trials. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology. Vol 130, 107-116.
Sehanovic, A, Smajlovic, Dz, Tupkovic, E, Ibrahimagic, O.C, Kunic, S, Dostovic,Z, Zoletic, E, Pasic, P (2020). Cognitive Disorders in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Mater Sociomed. 32(3): 191-195.
Sehanovic, A, Kunic, S, Ibrahimagic, O, C, Smajlovic, Dz, Tupkovic, E, Mehicevic. A, Zoletic, E (2020). Contributing Factors to the Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis. Medical Archives 74(5):368.
Salihović, D., Smajlović,Đž, Mijajlović, M., Zoletić, E, Ibrahimagić, O.(2018). Cognitive syndromes after the first stroke. Neurological Sciences, Springer Nature. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10072-018-3447-6.
Zoletic, E., Durakovic-Belko,E (2009). Body image distortion, perfectionism, eating disorders in group of fashion models and ballerinas. Danubine psychiatry Croatian medical journal. Vol. 21, No. 3, 302–309.